Introductions for Primary 3 – Primary 6 Compositions

Many students have an issue starting a story. Some are abrupt, others use the same sentence in every composition and others write too long introductions and have lesser time to work on the themes.

There are many ways to begin a story. Here are a few to help you.


Introductions:

1) Weather

Describing the weather is a great way to start your story. It sets the stage for when the story takes place. Morning? Afternoon or night time? Is there a thunderstorm brewing or is it the usual hot, humid day?

Sunrise

The morning’s sunrise was a breathtaking display of radiant colors. Bright streaks of red, pink, and orange slowly overcame the dark blue and purple of the twilight sky as all the colors perfectly blended into each other. The sun itself was just peeking out of the horizon and its brilliant rays already shining brightly and began to warm the air.

Afternoon

The sun’s rays beat down mercilessly on me as I wiped the perspiration from my face. It was another muggy day in the small island I called home and I could feel my clammy shirt sticking to my back. I trudged on home, my large, square backpack loaded with homework, wearing me down.

Sunset

The sun was slowly going down the horizon. As it slowly descended, the burning light of the sun got dull and it looked like a huge disc of orange and yellow. The sun’s orange was mingling with the light blue colour of the sky and it produced a vast contrast of different colours. It was like watching a screen slowly changing


2) Dialogue

Starting a story with dialogue can also set the stage before the action happens.

The dialogue can be a warning.

“Don’t forget to bring your umbrella!” mother yelled from the kitchen.

It can tell the reader where the setting will take place.

“Hurry up!” urged my impatient younger sister. “All the good spots on the beach are filling up as you stand looking at yourself in the mirror!”


3) Descriptive start

Describing the setting of the scene is also a great way to begin. It may seem abrupt but when done correctly, the reader can feel that they are immediately part of the story.

I heaved my heavy school bag off my shoulder and threw it on the ground. I watched my homework spill out onto the floor of my cramped 3-room flat but it did not bother me at all. My total focus was reaching the refrigerator for a cool glass of Ribena. I lay down on the sofa, shut my eyes and started to relax.